''

Sylvia Seaside by Stella Vine

A pleasant way to spend this coming Saturday afternoon might be to take a stroll down from Tufnell Park to Primrose Hill – and catch intriguing shows by two seminal artists.

Darbeloff-forbidden-appleUp on Fortess Road, Natalie d’Arbeloff is currently showing paintings and box-works (mixed media constructions), including her Apple Series, which portrays the hard, shiny fruit “in unfamiliar ways”, she says.

The painter, printmaker and writer (whom we interviewed last year here) was born in Paris of French and Russian parents, and raised in South America, USA and Europe. And yet despite such international pedigree – not to mention having exhibited at galleries across the world – she’s opted on this occasion for her cosy local caff.

“The soft lighting, terra cotta walls and bookshelves of Rustique (also known as the Literary Cafe) provide an ambience which suits these intimate works,” she says.

Meanwhile, a half an hour wander away (you could even swing by the last weekend of Andy Holden at the Zabludowicz en route) British artist Stella Vine is back with a one-day show at Cecil Sharp House in Primrose Hill – her first in London in eight years.

Diana

Diana Blue Dress

Like D’arbeloff, Vine, who was “discovered” a decade ago by Charles Saatchi, 
has 
deliberately 
opted 
for 
a 
venue 
that 
she 
feels 
a 
close
 affinity 
with.
 “I 
like 
the 
building 
and 
the 
people,” she says 
of 
Cecil 
Sharp 
House,
 home 
to 
the
 English 
Folk 
Dance 
and 
Song 
Society.
 “It’s 
homely
 and 
creative,
 a 
lovely
 part 
of 
the 
community,
 accessible,
 affordable
 and 
it 
reminds
 me 
of 
Scottish 
dancing
 classes
 as 
a 
small 
child 
in 
Alnwick.”

Melting Into you comprises entirely new works by the artist made famous by now-iconic images of Kate Moss, Sylvia Plath (main pic, above) and Princess Diana.

This is box title
A Small Exhibition by D’Arbeloff runs until December 20 at Rustique, 142 Fortess Road NW5. Vine’s Melting Into You is open on Saturday 14th December from 2pm – 4pm. Cecil 
Sharp
 House,
2 
Regent’s 
Park 
Road, NW1 
7AY

Previous post

Christmas stuff - from City Farm to Night Market

Next post

British Library to host hip-hop Canterbury Tales